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What could it mean to ‘decolonize’ when it comes to addressing global poverty? What are the anti-colonial responses taking place to confront the ongoing impacts of British colonialism and imperialism? This year-long series will explore some of these questions across New Internationalist’s website and magazine.

Women sift stones for building material at the abandoned slagheap of the Chinese-owned Luanshya Copper Mine, in Kitwe, Zambia. ​​​​​​​Credit: Joerg Boethling/Alamy 

Debt crises are back with a vengeance as the dollar goes from strength to strength and interest rates rise. As the International Monetary Fund keeps pushing austerity, Zambian journalist Zanji Valerie Sinkala explores whether that’s really a solution to her country’s economic woes.

A group of women are pictured tending to vegetables in Koyli Alpha, Senegal, in 2019. They were taking part in the Great Green Wall project which hopes to restore 100 million hectares of degraded land across the African continent by 2030. Simon Townsley/Panos

It brings power and wealth to whoever holds it, but land should be treated as a public good, argues Amy Hall.

New Internationalist launches a one-year series exploring responses to poverty that address the reality of post-independence power dynamics within and between countries.

Illustration shows a couple with a baby gazing on to a green pastured horizon with birds gathering in the air. Image created by Julie Flett for We Sang You  Home by Richard Van Camp, published by Orca  Book Publishers

Riley Yesno explores some of the ways the Indigenous-led movement is redistributing land and wealth in North America.

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