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After Ebola

The world’s media extensively covered the Ebola crisis at its peak, but now the epidemic’s impact on communities in West Africa has fallen off the news agenda. And while millions of donor dollars eventually poured in to help contain and defeat the virus, its after effects – social, cultural and economic – will continue to be felt for years to come. We take a critical look at the humanitarian response and health systems deficit. Ebola is not a new disease – it’s been around since 1976 – so why did over 11,000 West Africans die 2014-16?

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Included in this issue

Did we learn the right lessons from Ebola?

And will Sierra Leone be ready, should the virus return? Hazel Healy travelled there to find out.

A word with Aziza Brahim

The Western Saharan singer and activist on Cuban solidarity, life as a refugee, and making her grandmother proud.

'Everything is on my shoulders'

Serah Tomba went from being a student to sole carer of seven orphans.

'I speak for the girls'

Elizabeth Katta talks about the lingering impacts of teenage pregnancy, which spiked during Ebola.

Mixed Media: Films

This month's film reviews.

Mixed Media: Music

This month's music reviews.

'These are the boys who fought Ebola!'

Gangsters turned mobilizers, the Tripoli Boys kicked Ebola out of their neighbourhood. Amjata Bayoh and Mohamed S Camara find out...

The most forgotten

Ruby Diamonde travels to the bush in search of an answer to a difficult question.

Love without touch

Bankolay Turay’s story of student romance on ice.

For better or worse

Mamie Lebbi, the first woman to test positive for Ebola, describes how she survived in the bush with her husband’s help.

Where my father lies

Mariama B Jalloh’s quest to find her father’s resting place among the unmarked graves of those lost to Ebola in Sierra Leone.

Against their will

Roxana Olivera meets indigenous women in Peru who are still waiting for justice, two decades after being forcibly sterilized.

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