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Cover for Trafficked

September 2007's Issue

The trafficking of women and children for sexual exploitation has reached epidemic proportions in the past decade. An estimated one million people – mainly girls and women – are currently trafficked into the sex industry by people ranging from violent gangsters to trusted family members. This issue of New Internationalist tackles this most cruel manifestation of globalization.

Every month, we put up a selection of articles from the magazine. To enjoy the complete magazine, subscribe and receive three free issues and a world map. Or buy a digital subscription which gives you unlimited access to all magazines since 2007 and for a year after purchase on your computer or mobile device, in their original full-colour design.

Featured in issue 404

Free Binayak Sen!

The arrest of a doctor who works with poor communities in central India, on trumped-up charges of associating with ‘terrorist’ Naxalites, has sparked worldwide protest. Mari Marcel Thekaekara appeals for support.

Offset your carbon emissions

Polyp suggests a new way to resist climate change.

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Summer Seriously Roundup

True tales of a mixed-up world

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Forward, eco-comrades

China tries crackdown on polluters.

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Oh, Mandy

Mandelson and EU riding roughshod

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Youngest Afghan politician banned

Listen to Malalai Joya on Radio New Internationalist

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Living wage campaign launched

North American workers unite behind idea of hourly minimum wage

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Another damned dam

Laotian villagers become guinea pigs in a vast and risky resettlement process

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Trafficked

Vanessa Baird examines the global trade in girls and young women sold into the sex industry.

India’s Viagra -
Special Economic Zones

India wants to follow in the footsteps of China, popping miracle pills to raise the country up to export-led superstardom. What Dionne Bunsha, Maureen Nandini Mitra and Jayati Ghosh discover is a little less uplifting.

PR for the planet

PR practitioner shames his colleagues

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The language of diplomacy

The language of diplomacy…

Costa Rica

Costa Rica stands apart from its Central American neighbours, not least because it has no army.

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Court convicts over child soldiers

Sierra Leone war crime convictions

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Guns and justice in the Niger Delta

Rebels in the Niger Delta have taken up arms – Ike Oguine explains what lies behind their resistance.

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Action, contacts and resources

Action, contacts and resources.

  • 1 Sep 2007
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A Death in Durban

Death of a South African environmental activist

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Tatiana Cardeal

Street children reaching for fish in Nairobi, captured by Brazilian photographer Tatiana Cardeal

Stop Traffick!

Creative ideas from around the world.

‘I never want to be rescued again’

Some anti-trafficking measures are doing more harm than good, argues Melissa Ditmore.

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Refugee Special

Acting From the Heart: Australian advocates for asylum seekers tell their stories

Knowing the difference

Bishakha Datta goes to the heart of a highly polarized debate.

How the World Came to Oxford: Refugee stories past and present

How the World Came to Oxford: Refugee stories past and present

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Towards A Promised Land

Towards A Promised Land

  • 1 Sep 2007
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No-One is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the US-Mexico Border

No-One is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the US-Mexico Border

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Waitress

Waitress

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Lady Chatterley

Lady Chatterley

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Alevanta!

Alevanta!

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Running out of lies

Letter from Lebanon Special

  • 1 Sep 2007
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The Dusty Foot on the Road

The Dusty Foot on the Road

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Meet the traffickers

Victor Malarek shines a light on people who sell people.

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Robert B Zoellick

Robert B Zoellick has finally reached his Promised Land as World Bank President. What can we expect?

  • 1 Sep 2007
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Use my name

From Moldova and Nigeria, survivors tell their stories to Louisa Waugh.

Cover of the Three decades of change in an African village of New Internationalist

On Newsstands

Three decades of change in an African village

In the January-February 2017 issue of New Internationalist Chris Brazier completes a unique journalistic project by returning to the village in Burkina Faso, in west Africa, that he first visited in 1985 while making a film.

He visited in 1995 and 2005 to report on changes in the lives of individuals and on the progress of development in the community. The previous magazines have offered an intriguing insight into the lives of people battling against poverty and have reported on substantial positive changes in the life of the community – from the opening of a health centre and a primary school in the village to the first appearance of mobile phones.

Have the past 11 years of change brought further progress? And are the individuals that we have tracked over the three decades still healthy and happy?

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The coming war on China

The coming war on China: A major US military build-up – including nuclear weapons – is underway in Asia and the Pacific with the purpose of confronting China. This is provocative and dangerous, argues John Pilger in his special report. Tax avoidance: An in-depth and global look at how corporations and rich individuals are looting the public purse – and why governments are allowing them to get away with it. Edited by Josh Eisen and Richard Swift.

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– Emma Thompson –

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