New Internationalist

Cover for January/February 2006 - Issue 386

January 2006's Issue

For the first time in human history a majority of the world’s people will soon be living in slums in the global South. Already one in six people is a slum dweller – and that number is set to double in the next 30 years.

Scrambling for work, struggling to survive, these poor communities face an uphill battle. This month’s New Internationalist reports on the conditions of slum life around the world.

Every month, we put up a selection of articles from the magazine. To enjoy the complete magazine, subscribe and receive three free issues and a world map. Or buy a digital subscription which gives you unlimited access to all magazines since 2007 and for a year after purchase on your computer or mobile device, in their original full-colour design.

Featured in issue 386

A tsunami of demolitions

Africa’s squatters are up against ruthless state power. Andrew Meldrum reports on Harare and beyond.

Prohibited items

Travelling through Honduras, El Salvador, Mexico and the US, Eduardo Galeano is searched for ‘prohibited items’.

In hope of justice

In the last of her monthly letters Reem Haddad returns to the murder that has obsessed her nation.

Interview with Aram Aharonian, Director General of teleSUR

The newly launched Latin American TV channel, teleSur, is offering a distinctive Southern perspective on the news – and is already causing consternation in the US Congress as a result. Meet its Director General, Aram Aharonian.

Bob Geldof

Does Africa any longer need Bob Geldof as its champion? After Live 8 many people are saying no.

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Snapshots from shantytown

A photo essay of squatter life.

Renewables take off

Renewables take off

Empire Left & Right

The idea of empire has certainly made a comeback at both ends of the political spectrum. Richard Swift guides us through the troubled water from Hardt & Negri right through to Niall Ferguson – with a bit of graphic help from Polyp.

Forgotten massacre

Forgotten fatwa on Iran’s left

The lease on life

Richard Swift meets the determined squatters of Bangkok who don’t know the meaning of the word eviction.

2 Girls

2 Girls by Perihan Magden

Architects of our futures

Robert Neuwirth tells what he learned from his two years of living with squatters on three continents.

Words on the street from a globetrotters' phrasebook

Global squattertalk.

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Reconstructing peace

Post-tsunami threat to Sri Lankan peace


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Witness to AIDS

Witness to AIDS by Edwin Cameron

Patterns of Protest; Deadly Consequences

Patterns of Protest by John Crabtree; Deadly Consequences by Jim Shultz

Head-On/Crossing the Bridge

Head-On/ Crossing the Bridge directed by Fatih Akin

Brokeback Mountain

Brokeback Mountain directed by Ang Lee

LDA v The Lunatics

LDA v The Lunatics by Los De Abajo

Squatter citizens

Profiles from the frontlines: the politics of survival in some of the world’s grittiest slums.

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At the top of the hill

A poet’s view of from Rio’s favelas by Gabriela Tôrres Barbosa.

Songs of the Volcano

Songs of the Volcano by Papua New Guinea Stringbands with Bob Brozman

Welcome to Squatter Town

By 2030 there will be over two billion squatters worldwide. Richard Swift reports on their attempt to carve out their own piece of urban space.

The Best of 2005

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Cover of the World Fiction Special of New Internationalist

On Newsstands

World Fiction Special

World Fiction

Fiction has entered a new era. Writers of novels and short stories are no longer writing only for their own nation or even for readers speaking their own language but are breaking national boundaries and reaching a worldwide audience. In the process authors from Africa, Asia and Latin America are winning greater prominence – and a new phenomenon identified as ‘world writing’ has emerged.

This issue of New Internationalist not only analyses these developments but also showcases four exquisite short stories as examples: ‘Fat’ by Krys Lee from South Korea; ‘In The Garden’ by FT Kola from South Africa; ‘Ghosts’ by the Cuban-American Ana Menéndez; and ‘The Lake Retba Murder’ by Efemia Chela from Zambia and Ghana.


Online now

Trade unions

A relic of a bygone era – or a billion-strong social movement fighting for workers’ rights everywhere? The reality of trade unionism today falls somewhere in between. In the Western world, union-busting laws, globalization and internal conflicts have left many trade unions reeling. In some countries of the Global South, trade unionists face discrimination, danger and even death. Meanwhile, workers’ rights are being sacrificed on the altar of corporate greed gone mad: zero-contract hours, sub-contracting, privatization, outsourcing and special economic zones are all part of a ‘race to the bottom’ being run by transnationals concerned only about their profits.
Yet all is not lost. From Colombia to China, Bangladesh to Barcelona, workers are still fighting for their rights – and, sometimes, winning. This issue, New Internationalist looks at the state of the unions, how they need to adapt to the new reality for workers in the 21st century, and why they are more important than ever.

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– Emma Thompson –

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