New Internationalist

Cover for Women's rights (Issue 373)

November 2004's Issue

It is nearly 10 years since the last United Nations conference on women in Beijing. On the surface, women seem to have won many of the rights they were fighting for.

But this issue digs a little deeper into our post-feminist world. It looks at the situation of women around the world, where things are not all that they might seem. It examines the forces preventing change and argues that women’s rights are also men’s business.

Every month, we put up a selection of articles from the magazine. To enjoy the complete magazine, subscribe and receive three free issues and a world map. Or buy a digital subscription which gives you unlimited access to all magazines since 2007 and for a year after purchase on your computer or mobile device, in their original full-colour design.

Featured in issue 373

Mao the mass murderer

  • 10 Nov 2004
  • 0

O little town

  • 8 Nov 2004
  • 0

Slavery distinctions

  • 6 Nov 2004
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Schools of belief

  • 5 Nov 2004
  • 0

Ethical consumption

  • 2 Nov 2004
  • 0

Antonio Fiorente

  • 1 Nov 2004
  • 1

The other side of silence

Violence against women is a bigger killer than cancer or traffic accidents. Nikki van der Gaag explains what can be done.

Women who have moved worlds

A few of the many who are creating justice.

Wordpower

Wordpower - the language of oil.

Written in the stars

Reem Haddad uses the fatalism of Lebanese society to her own advantage.

  • 1 Nov 2004
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A drama unfolds

As the tide turns against abortion across the world, Hersilia Fonseca and Patricia Pujol report on Uruguay’s unique experiment.

MEXICO

Western charity undermines African textiles

Western second-hand clothing hampers local production in Uganda

Democracy is dead

Paul Kingsnorth asks if democracy can be reinvented.

The energy tug-of-war

The World Bank wades into an energy tug-of-war

  • 1 Nov 2004
  • 0

Confessions of the Torturer

Torture is used not to protect people but to terrorize them. Eduardo Galeano examines its uses and abuses.

Fish money

Relations between the sexes in rural Gambia.

Naked power

  • 1 Nov 2004
  • 0

What price freedom?

Has the occupation of Iraq at least made things better for women? Jo Wilding reports.

Interview with Olava

Homophobia is still so strong in Indian society that Shaina, from the Organized Lesbian Alliance for Visibility and Action (OLAVA), does not want to give her real name.

Polyp's Big Bad World – November 2004

Religions of the world, as seen by Polyp.

Mapou

Mapou by René Lacaille

A Way of Life

A Way of Life directed by Amma Asante

A woman's rite

Why is it so hard to change traditional practices? Nikki van der Gaag reports on a group that is trying.

Sold Out: The true cost of supermarket shopping

Sold Out: The true cost of supermarket shopping by William Young.

Spirit of Mambesak

Spirit of Mambesak by Black Paradise

A Black woman took my job

Michael Kimmel shows how the behaviour of men is the single greatest obstacle to equality – and explains why sharing housework means more sex.

The In-Between World of Vikram Lall

The In-Between World of Vikram Lall by MG Vassanji

Written in the stars

  • 1 Nov 2004
  • 0

Gaza Blues: Different Stories

Gaza Blues by Samir El-Youssef and Etgar Keret

A long and winding road

Snapshots of the struggle down the ages.

  • 1 Nov 2004
  • 0

Iran's neo-conservatives

Iran’s new breed of neo-conservatives brook no dissent. They include Saeed Mortazavi, implicated in the beating to death of Canadian photojournalist Zahra Kazami in 2003.

  • 1 Nov 2004
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What women have gained and what they are in danger of losing

Nikki van der Gaag looks at what has changed for women over the years – and what has not.

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World Fiction

Fiction has entered a new era. Writers of novels and short stories are no longer writing only for their own nation or even for readers speaking their own language but are breaking national boundaries and reaching a worldwide audience. In the process authors from Africa, Asia and Latin America are winning greater prominence – and a new phenomenon identified as ‘world writing’ has emerged.

This issue of New Internationalist not only analyses these developments but also showcases four exquisite short stories as examples: ‘Fat’ by Krys Lee from South Korea; ‘In The Garden’ by FT Kola from South Africa; ‘Ghosts’ by the Cuban-American Ana Menéndez; and ‘The Lake Retba Murder’ by Efemia Chela from Zambia and Ghana.

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– Emma Thompson –

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