New Internationalist

Cover for July 1980 - Issue 089 - Women - more to lose than their chains

July 1980's Issue

This month’s New Internationalist looks at the problem of world-wide ‘apartheid by sex’. First of a special two-part report on women and world development.

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Featured in issue 089

Women work twice as hard as men

Assessing women’s work in both the underdeveloped and overdeveloped world - by Eve Hall and Peter Adamson.

My Problem, My Husband

A Filipino mother explains. By Mila LaHoz.

Underworld of Women

Two of the 40 million women in one of the poorest nations on earth - interviewed by Sue Tuckwell.


The bright side of a squatter settlement. Julia Daia and Claire Swale meet an optimistic Gracie Alexander in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

NI Poster

The Balancing Act

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

For the Sake of my Son

Liberation isn’t even a dream for Bela. Neerja Chowdhury talks to her.

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

Sugar-Cane Blues for Doña Ettelvina and family

Olga Stavrakis reports from Belize on a sugar can boom which benefits everyone but the women.

Life without Men

Debbie Taylor reports from Odi village, Botswana where half the men are away goldmining.

Women - The Facts

Information on the world’s women.

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

More to Lose than their Chains

Lesley Adamson sets the scene on apartheid by sex.

Staying Cool

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

Milking Time

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

Gold Rush

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

The Invisible Woman

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

Chinese Pills

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0

Peddling Pesticide

  • 1 Jul 1980
  • 0
Cover of the World Fiction Special of New Internationalist

On Newsstands

World Fiction Special

World Fiction

Fiction has entered a new era. Writers of novels and short stories are no longer writing only for their own nation or even for readers speaking their own language but are breaking national boundaries and reaching a worldwide audience. In the process authors from Africa, Asia and Latin America are winning greater prominence – and a new phenomenon identified as ‘world writing’ has emerged.

This issue of New Internationalist not only analyses these developments but also showcases four exquisite short stories as examples: ‘Fat’ by Krys Lee from South Korea; ‘In The Garden’ by FT Kola from South Africa; ‘Ghosts’ by the Cuban-American Ana Menéndez; and ‘The Lake Retba Murder’ by Efemia Chela from Zambia and Ghana.


Online now

Trade unions

A relic of a bygone era – or a billion-strong social movement fighting for workers’ rights everywhere? The reality of trade unionism today falls somewhere in between. In the Western world, union-busting laws, globalization and internal conflicts have left many trade unions reeling. In some countries of the Global South, trade unionists face discrimination, danger and even death. Meanwhile, workers’ rights are being sacrificed on the altar of corporate greed gone mad: zero-contract hours, sub-contracting, privatization, outsourcing and special economic zones are all part of a ‘race to the bottom’ being run by transnationals concerned only about their profits.
Yet all is not lost. From Colombia to China, Bangladesh to Barcelona, workers are still fighting for their rights – and, sometimes, winning. This issue, New Internationalist looks at the state of the unions, how they need to adapt to the new reality for workers in the 21st century, and why they are more important than ever.

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If you would like to know something about what's actually going on, rather than what people would like you to think was going on, then read the New Internationalist.

– Emma Thompson –

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