New Internationalist

Cover for April 1980 - Issue 086 - Employment crisis in the Third World

April 1980's Issue

Well-paid, productive work is the most basic of human needs. Yet it’s denied to millions of people in rich and poor countries alike. Incomes of the poor majority in the Third World stagnate. Western nations, faced with global recession and job-displacing new technology, have abandoned all hope of full employment. We investigate this looming job crisis.

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Featured in issue 086

Making Work

A picture summary of the employment problem.

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

Cheaper than machines

Diana Roose looks at the working lives of women in Southeast Asia’s electronics industry.

Chipping Away Jobs

Mick Mclean on micro-electronics and the new automation technology.

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

The World of Work

Facts and figures on the changing job picture.

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

The Most Basic Need

Wayne Ellwood reports on the global battle for well-paid work.

Brazilian Gasahol

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

The Trade Games

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

Where are They Now?

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

A Political Party?

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

Overworked and Underpaid

Glen Williams on the work of Indonesia’s rural poor.

'Bhaiya, awhee proper punish'

The struggle of Guyana’s sugar workers. By Mike Jones.

Striking points

Myths about the right to strike.

  • 1 Apr 1980
  • 0

America's Working Poor

Richard Kaziz surveys some encouraging and innovative attempts to organize low-paid and unemployed workers in the U.S.

Scrambling for a foothold

What trade unions offer. Joe Holland looks at the Philippines and Richard Kaziz at attempts to organize America’s working poor.

Barefoot Businessmen

Peter Harrison investigates how the poor make ends meet and Peter Stalker talks to one squatter family in India.

Cover of the Trade unions: rebuild, renew, resist of New Internationalist

On Newsstands

Trade unions: rebuild, renew, resist

Trade unions

A relic of a bygone era – or a billion-strong social movement fighting for workers’ rights everywhere? The reality of trade unionism today falls somewhere in between. In the Western world, union-busting laws, globalization and internal conflicts have left many trade unions reeling. In some countries of the Global South, trade unionists face discrimination, danger and even death. Meanwhile, workers’ rights are being sacrificed on the altar of corporate greed gone mad: zero-contract hours, sub-contracting, privatization, outsourcing and special economic zones are all part of a ‘race to the bottom’ being run by transnationals concerned only about their profits.
Yet all is not lost. From Colombia to China, Bangladesh to Barcelona, workers are still fighting for their rights – and, sometimes, winning. This issue, New Internationalist looks at the state of the unions, how they need to adapt to the new reality for workers in the 21st century, and why they are more important than ever.

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Smiley-faced monopolists

For Facebook, Amazon and Google, we have traded our privacy for something we find useful and put on hold our support for ethical shopping in exchange for the ease of low (or no) price and almost-instant gratification. This month's magazine looks at just how far down the line we are and asks how deeply exploitative and anti-democratic is this new ‘surveillance capitalism’ under which we now live. This month’s contributors include security expert Bruce Schneier, psychologist Robert Epstein and engineer and software activist Prabir Purkayastha.

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