New Internationalist

Cameroon’s women call time on breast ironing

May 2013

Breast ironing is seldom talked about, but the practice has a devastating effect on the girls in whose communities it is performed. Amy Hall investigates.

When paediatrician Tamara Bugembe was first forwarded the email about ‘breast ironing’, she shuddered. But she didn’t take it seriously until a few years later, when she was working in Cameroon.

‘Breast ironing’, or ‘flattening’, aims to stem the growth of the breasts in the hope that it will help prevent unwanted male attention and delay a girl’s sexual activity. It is usually carried out by the mother or another member of the family, sometimes, even the girl herself. A heated tool, such as a pestle, is used.

© Aurora Photos / Alamy
Stemming development: Tools used for breast ironing are often those found around the house and then heated. This mother holds a stone and pestle. © Aurora Photos / Alamy

The practice is common in Cameroon, although rarely talked about. Research by Cameroonian women’s organization RENATA and Germany’s Association for International Co-operation (GTZ) in 2006 found that 24 per cent of young girls and women in Cameroon had experienced it.

Similar procedures have been recorded in countries including Nigeria, Togo, Republic of Guinea, Côte d’Ivoire and South Africa.

Margaret Nyuydzewira is co-founder of CAME Women and Girls’ Development Organization (CAWOGIDO), based in London. She believes the procedure is also being carried out in Britain. ‘I met a police officer who was telling me they arrested a woman in Birmingham who was doing breast ironing, and because nobody knew about it, they thought it was her culture and let her go. We cannot say it’s culture because it’s harm that is being done to a child,’ she explains.

‘At 10, my breasts were small and fallen like that of an old mother. Each time I undress I am ashamed’

A campaign to raise awareness about breast ironing has begun in the Netherlands.

The term ‘breast ironing’ is enough to make your toes curl, but for some mothers the alternative for their daughters seems much worse. The average age of rape victims in Cameroon is 15.

Tamara Bugembe has been working with Voluntary Services Overseas in Cameroon since September 2012. She has had two patients, aged 24 and 15, who came to her with swellings on the breast which turned out to be cysts.

It wasn’t until later that their mothers revealed they had previously ‘ironed’ their daughters’ breasts. ‘The girls were in boarding school and they were worried that the teachers would be using them to perform sexual favours, or that they would be raped. One mum was especially relieved – she’d clearly been beating herself over it thinking she had done something permanently harmful to her daughter.’

Georgette Taku, Programme Officer at RENATA, says it began the first campaign to raise awareness of breast ironing in 2006. ‘Before this, people did not know about the consequences; they just thought it was a means of helping the girl erase the signs of puberty and avoid the trap of early pregnancy,’ she says.

Nakinti Besumbu Nofuru/Gender Danger
Empowering girls against breast ironing in Cameroon. Nakinti Besumbu Nofuru/Gender Danger

This was not the case for Ben, who is now 48 years old but underwent breast ironing in Cameroon when she was 13. Her mother used a spatula, normally used for cooking. She feels that the experience pushed her into having a child early, at 18, because of her lack of confidence. She now has seven children. ‘It has affected every area of my life,’ she says.

‘We never had a name for it like “breast ironing”; we just knew it was a kind of tradition. I had a lot of friends who were from Europe and hadn’t had it done and my breasts were not the same. When we went swimming I was embarrassed.’

But Ben’s eldest daughter also had her breasts ‘ironed’ – by Ben’s mother-in-law. ‘I see it having the same effect on her; she also had a baby early. I believe strongly that it should be stopped.’

Gender danger

Breasts can be a focus of unwanted attention and personal shame, especially for early developers. Fifty per cent of women in the 2006 GIZ/RENATA study who had their breasts ironed had started developing breasts at nine years old.

One woman told RENATA: ‘My elder sister decided to massage them every evening with hot water and a towel. This was very painful and before I slept, she would fasten a very big elastic belt around my chest to help flatten the breasts. Six months later, my breasts were weak. At 10, my breasts were small and fallen like that of an old mother. Each time I undress I am ashamed.’

Chi Yvonne Leina is a 31-year-old Cameroonian journalist and activist who founded Gender Danger, an organization that campaigns against breast ironing. She was 14 when she saw her grandmother ‘ironing’ her cousin Aline’s breasts with a grinding stone as she peeped through a hole in the wall.

‘I got to understand why my beautiful cousin had changed completely: because grandma was “fixing” her!’ After that, Leina says, she lived in fear: ‘I thought maybe that’s what they do to everyone who has breasts.’

Sure enough, a few months later her grandma approached her, but Leina threatened to tell the neighbours and her mother. ‘Out of fear, grandma gave up. She anxiously watched me as I grew, expecting the worst to happen at any time.

‘I made up my mind that I will be the voice for those women who can’t talk for themselves in my community. That led to my choice of journalism and advocacy for women as a career.’

So far Gender Danger, which was set up in 2012, has talked to over 200,000 women about breast ironing and the importance of sex education for their children.

‘It’s when people start opening up and talking that you find out what’s going on,’ points out Nyuydzewira. ‘I went to Islington [London] to give a talk and this lady from Greece said, “Oh yeah, they do it in Greece, too”.’

‘People did not know about the consequences; they just thought breast ironing was a means of helping the girl erase the signs of puberty and avoid the trap of early pregnancy’

Nyuydzewira, who is originally from Cameroon, compares attitudes towards breast ironing with those directed at female genital mutilation (FGM) in the past. We all know that FGM happens, she says, even though we may never have seen it taking place. ‘Organizations [working against FGM] are mobilized. [In Britain], the police are involved, the social services are involved.

‘Every time somebody asks, “How do you know that breast ironing is going on?”, I say, “I’m from the community.” You’ll never see it, but we know that it is quietly happening.’

The clandestine nature of the practice means that some people think it’s an experience they alone have suffered. Rebecca Tapscott conducted a study of breast ironing in Cameroon in 2012. ‘I spoke to a lot of people who said: “That’s completely ridiculous, nobody would do that”,’ she says. ‘I heard about a minister who found out about it and thought it was terrible; he then went home and found out that his wife did it to his daughter.’

There is currently no specific legislation against breast ironing in Cameroon. Georgette Taku thinks that passing a law and starting to make arrests would make people think twice: ‘It would raise eyebrows.’

But Tapscott is not convinced that the law would be enforced. ‘You could make the argument that that sort of legislation is useful because it sends out a message when the state comes out on something, but I wonder if that is as far as it goes.

‘It’s really taboo [in Cameroon] to talk to children about sex and responsible relationships, which I think leads to this dramatic response.’

Taku says the biggest obstacle is getting on board everyone concerned with the rights of women and girls: ‘People who are supposed to be at the forefront, who are supposed to take up the fight, are staying quiet.’

But she thinks things are improving. ‘Some parents are opening up and trying to bring their children closer to them through sexual education rather than using methods like breast ironing; to help their children not become victims of one problem or the other.’

On 27 September 2013, CAWOGIDO is organizing a conference on breast ironing in London. To find out more go to

Front cover of New Internationalist magazine, issue 462 This feature was published in the May 2013 issue of New Internationalist. To read more, buy this issue or subscribe.

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  1. #1 Pamela 06 Jun 13

    Surely, as well as the education of women around the issues of body mutilation, there needs to be a parallel education of boys and men. It seems to me that both FGM and this breast ironing practice is as a direct result of the fear evoked in women by men. These problems will never be resolved unless men are able to assume control of themselves and educate their boys that to be a real man they should be in control of their actions and take responsibility for their actions at all times. After all they are humans not animals.

  2. #2 Amy Hall 07 Jun 13

    Hi Pamela, you will be glad to hear that RENATA and other groups are also speaking to boys and men about gender based violence etc, as well as speaking to women about breast ironing. Thanks for your comment.

  3. #3 Kathy 13 Jan 14

    I don't understand, are all the men in the Cameroons rapists and beasts, that little girls have to undergo this kind of torture to make them ’unappealing’ to these men? What kind of men are they, where is their self-control, their respect for others? And where are the women of Cameroon in this, why are they torturing their daughters instead of speaking out against this dreadful practice and teaching their daughters self-defense against rapists?

  4. #4 sital das 10 Feb 14

    I Love for Girls.

  5. #6 Ms Leen 03 Mar 14

    I watch these videos of how these young girl are be breast ironing and some of the ones who are doing have large breast themselves, they need to do their own. Every one of those girls should have their own choice once they have become a grown woman.

    If it was intended on women not having breast then we would be born that way. Its sad that the mothers do this to their precious daughters' so sad.

    Happy to know that you are being the girls voice, they really need that, and every woman should be their voice. They should experience what every other girl experience, the beginning of being a woman and wearing a bra.

    There should be a law against breast ironing. Here in the United Stated we call that child abuse and that child would be taken from that mother. They need the same law.

    Keep up the good work that you do for these girls. Keep the voice to the point your voice will be heard by many and your voice will become our voice.


  6. #7 Bente Samuel 10 Nov 14

    I would like to contact Margaret Nyuydzewira from CAME Women's and Girl's Development Organistation and to anyone else involved in helping Women in Cameroon to stop the practice of ' Breast Ironing '.
    I live in Farnham Surrey.
    Kind regards
    Bente Samue ( Cross Cultural Therapist. )

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This article was originally published in issue 462

New Internationalist Magazine issue 462
Issue 462

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