New Internationalist

Eyes Wide Open

June 2010

Directed by Haim Tabakman

Aaron is a devout Haredi (Ultra-Orthodox Jew) who runs a butcher’s shop in an Orthodox Jewish neighbourhood in Jerusalem. He has a wife and four children, a questioning mind, and is hardworking and respected. Then he falls in love – with Ezri, a younger man he’s taken on as his assistant. Ezri, expelled from his yeshiva for his wayward sexuality, is known to Aaron’s rabbi.

Aaron is warned off, eventually with the threat of violence, but tries to be loyal to his lover, and his family and community. Small in scale, but, in faithfully presenting the social context and its control of what people are able to do, and even think, this tells a much bigger story.


This column was published in the June 2010 issue of New Internationalist. To read more, buy this issue or subscribe.

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This article was originally published in issue 433

New Internationalist Magazine issue 433
Issue 433

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New Internationalist Magazine Issue 436

If you would like to know something about what's actually going on, rather than what people would like you to think was going on, then read the New Internationalist.

– Emma Thompson –

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