New Internationalist

The Silence of Lorna

December 2008

Written and directed by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

Lorna, an Albanian working in a Belgian laundry, needs money to open a snack bar. The first step is citizenship, so she marries a very sick heroin addict who no-one expects to live very long. Then she plans to marry again, for money.

It all goes awry when Lorna can’t be as mercenary as the gangster who’s arranging her second marriage expects.

Rooted in time, place and social class, as all the Dardennes’ films are, this is an unsentimental, low-key and gripping drama that doesn’t let go. 

ML

This column was published in the December 2008 issue of New Internationalist. To read more, buy this issue or subscribe.

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This article was originally published in issue 418

New Internationalist Magazine issue 418
Issue 418

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