New Internationalist

No turning back: The history of feminism and the future of women

November 2002

This is a very thorough account of women’s struggles. Starting with women’s position in society in prehistoric times it moves through the centuries and across the globe, from slavery in Africa to class in medieval Europe, from the Civil Rights movement in the US to reproductive health in Latin America.

The arguments rehearsed on, say, ‘biology is destiny’, are well known. One could even say a little ‘old hat’. But the book does give a real sense of how the political goals of feminism have survived. Freedman bills No Turning Back as something she decided to write because ‘no single book existed’ that ‘brought together the interdisciplinary literature that the past generation of feminist scholars has produced’. But a bit more about the future to add to such vast tracts on the past would have been welcome.

Nikki van der Gaag

Front cover of New Internationalist magazine, issue 351 This column was published in the November 2002 issue of New Internationalist. To read more, buy this issue or subscribe.

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No turning back: The history of feminism and the future of women Fact File
Product information by Estelle B Freedman
Publisher Profile Books
Product number ISBN 186 197 345-4
Star rating3

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This article was originally published in issue 351

New Internationalist Magazine issue 351
Issue 351

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