New Internationalist

Carol Kaminju

September 2005
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Eight-year-old John Karanja carries firewood the traditional way – on his back. Kikuyu women and girls used to carry firewood, water and even children for long distances without getting tired. Karanja had walked for more than 10 kilometres in search of firewood for his family in a town called Kijabe – something he does more during school holidays. He did not seem bothered by what he was doing because it is normal to him. What struck me was the fact that roles have changed in the community – this chore used to be mainly for women and girls. He told me he would like to be a doctor so that he can help his family and community.

I was on my way to Narok – 60 kilometres from Nairobi – on an assignment. Being a photographer has shaped the way I appreciate the things I previously took for granted. I would like to highlight positive stories around me and share them with people from other parts of the world.

Carol Kaminju, Kenya
Email: [email protected]

This column was published in the September 2005 issue of New Internationalist. To read more, buy this issue or subscribe.

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