New Internationalist

Honduras trade protests

June 2005

On 3 March 2005, the Honduran Congress ratified the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) with the US, becoming the second country after El Salvador to do so. Indignant civil society groups immediately protested that the deal would make their country more dependent on the US, harming local producers in the process. The following week, a nationwide protest drew thousands on to the streets of the capital, Tegucigalpa. Across the country, barricades were set up on major highways, halting commerce. José Trinidad Sánchez, speaking for a network of alternative community commerce in Honduras, explains: ‘To sign this agreement with the United States is to lose our sovereignty, our identity and our rights as citizens.’

This column was published in the June 2005 issue of New Internationalist. To read more, buy this issue or subscribe.

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