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Crisis capitalism: Octopus energy

In the third installment of Heat the Rich – an investigative series on energy firms profiting from the cost of living crisis – Corporate Watch takes a critical look at the UK’s fourth-biggest energy supplier, Octopus Energy. 

Latest issue: November-December 2022

Take back the land

Kanaval: A People’s History of Haiti in Six Chapters

Cinematic in its style, offbeat in its storytelling, the BBC’s Kanaval – a documentary portrayal of Haiti’s annual carnival – showcases the island’s left-field and grassroots tales of revolution. Husna Ara speaks to co-director Leah Gordon.

Around 700 families were evicted from the  Amchang Wildlife Sanctuary in Assam, India  in November 2017, following an order of the  Guwahati High Court.  ZUMA PRESS /ALAMY

A target to turn 30 per cent of the world’s land into protected areas for nature by 2030 is set to be agreed by world leaders in December. But not everyone is happy about it, as Amy Hall reports.

A Dalit Women's 'Self Respect Yatra' (procession) begins in Kurukshetra, in the state of Haryana at the feet of the statue of Dalit Rights icon Dr. Ambedkar. Credit: Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Nilanjana Bhowmick's thoughts on the long shadow of caste.

Aruna Chandrasekhar argues that we need to keep one eye on the ‘other COP’.

A council of citizens and state officials deliberate over Algeria's just transition away from extractive industries. Crowds of people and workers celebrate watching over the economic and social changes taking place, including low-intensive agriculture and solar panel implementation in the background.

As Egypt prepares to host the latest UN climate conference, COP27, Hamza Hamouchene and Katie Sandwell call time on ‘business as usual’, which in North Africa means non-solutions that line private pockets at public expense and protect political elites.

A group of women are pictured tending to vegetables in Koyli Alpha, Senegal, in 2019. They were taking part in the Great Green Wall project which hopes to restore 100 million hectares of degraded land across the African continent by 2030. Simon Townsley/Panos

It brings power and wealth to whoever holds it, but land should be treated as a public good, argues Amy Hall.

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