New Internationalist

Law

Page 2 of 4

Squatting law is cause of problems, not a cure

Vyvian Raoul calls for change in England and Wales to avoid more deaths like that of a homeless man outside an empty Kent bungalow.

Filed in: Housing Law Society United Kingdom

What’s the price of the ‘right’ to alcohol?

Mari Marcel Thekaekara on the potential of prohibition in India where women have burnt down liquor shops over alcoholism’s devastation.

Filed in: Drugs India Law Society Women

‘I still don’t know whether I am free or not’

Uzma Falak meets a Kashmiri woman at the mercy of a failed justice system.

Filed in: Kashmir Law

‘Grow Heathrow’ could change housing law

A win for the community garden could see private landlords held to account under the European Convention of Human Rights. Michael Pooler reports.

Filed in: Environment Housing Human Rights Law United Kingdom

Filipino law is ‘cyber authoritarianism’

Iris Gonzales on the Cybercrime Prevention Act and why critics say it is an affront to civil liberties.

Filed in: Crime Internet Law Philippines Technology

Pharma vs India: a case of life or death for the world’s poor

Legal outcomes could ‘open the floodgates’ for companies to challenge generic drug production, keeping prices high, explains Nick Harvey.

Filed in: Health India Law Medicine

Why I don’t want a statue of Tony Blair

Felicity Arbuthnot has her own ideas about how the UK’s former Prime Minister could be remembered.

Filed in: Art Law Politics United Kingdom

Legalize drugs - all of them!

NI editor Vanessa Baird looks at the many reasons why this is the only option that makes sense.

Filed in: Drugs Health Law

Becoming criminal at home

From 1 September squatting residential buildings in England and Wales will be illegal. Phoenix Rainbow says this is unfair and unworkable.

Filed in: Housing Human Rights Law United Kingdom

Podcast: Vanessa Baird on legalizing drugs

Vanessa Baird explains why legalizing drugs could save lives and money around the world.

Filed in: Drugs Law

Gujarat massacre convictions must continue

British Indians need to be among those bringing the people responsible for the 2002 carnage to justice says Mari Marcel Thekaekara.

Filed in: Human Rights India Law United Kingdom

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