New Internationalist

Cover for Justice after genocide  - (Issue 385)

December 2005's Issue

Genocide, ‘ethnic cleansing’, mass murder – these have been depressingly familiar aspects of human history. But there are glimmers of hope and reasons for celebration. Not because the atrocities are fewer – witness the genocide in Darfur – but because there is an emerging sense that a global legal system is gradually being built which will bring perpetrators to justice. The truth may not lead automatically to justice. But without it there is no hope. This month’s NI looks at what people and nations must do to move beyond their murderous pasts.

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Featured in issue 385

House of Horror

In Buenos Aires, Tomás Bril Mascarenhas meets a young man who’s discovered a secret – about himself

A memory of Paine

Memorials keep the Chilean past alive for Carmen Rodríguez

Trial and Error

In Rwanda, thousands of accused killers await justice. Fawzia Sheikh looks at community alternatives.

Battle for the truth

Conflicted history in Armenia, Cambodia, Guatemala, East Timor and Japan.

Whose Truth?

Mark Freeman explains what truth commissions can and cannot do.

Challenging Impunity

The International Criminal Court may not be perfect, argues Noah Novogrodsky. But it’s a good start.

Mothers’ courage

Irham Čečo talks to the courageous women of Srebrenica

Justice after genocide ACTION

Resources and Action

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Crimes Against Humanity

His time will come, Geaorge Bush’s that is.

Truth and Fantasy

Mark Engler accuses the US of twisting El Salvador’s history to suit its foreign policy interests in Iraq.

Brixton Blues

Paul Bakalite rails against the dark arts of gentrification.

Eyes wide shut

Darfur, Sudan, through the eyes of children who’ve fled the conflict.

Just chocolate

Grenada’s revolutionary fair trade

Crime & punishment

How do nations recover from trauma? Wayne Ellwood reports on the emerging global justice system.

Green house, back door

Carbon trading’s impact on a South African suburb

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Interview with Debra Harry and the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism

Debra Harry and the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism.

Afflicted Powers

Afflicted Powers by Retort

Speaking in tongues

Faced with her daughter’s pioneering of a new language built from Arabic, French and English, Reem Haddad tears her hair out.

Argentina

101 downingstreet

George Orwell leaves his mark on Polyp’s latest ‘cartoon’.

War on corruption

Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo is clamping down on corruption. So why are ordinary Nigerians less than enthusiastic? Ike Oguine explains.

Tsvangirayi Mukwazh

  • 1 Dec 2005
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Ceasefire

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