New Internationalist

Cover for I've got a right! - (Issue 384)

November 2005's Issue

The struggle for equal rights for persons with disabilities often comes up against harsh economic realities in the Majority World. Cash shortages are what governments hide behind when they deny proper participation to a full 10 per cent of citizens, but they are by no means the only barrier disabled people want to knock down. Entrenched prejudice, ignorance and indifference often leave people with disabilities stranded outside society.

As disabled peoples’ organizations gain strength and begin to network in the Majority World, the momentum for change keeps building. This month’s NI will provide a space for persons with disabilities from a range of backgrounds to have their say.

Every month, we put up a selection of articles from the magazine. To enjoy the complete magazine, subscribe and receive three free issues and a world map. Or buy a digital subscription which gives you unlimited access to all magazines since 2007 and for a year after purchase on your computer or mobile device, in their original full-colour design.

Featured in issue 384

Power struggle

Uganda has the highest proportion of disabled people in government. Joseph Walugembe and Julia Peckett explore what this means.

Damu Smith

Grassroots organizer Damu Smith has spent his life battling against the odds. Now he’s taking on his two biggest challenges: the US healthcare system (or lack of it) and his own cancer.

Petro- provocation

Iran’s shift away from the petrodollar may hurt the US

Morocco

Revolución rampista!

When local government had to move out of the way of activists on a mission. Tomás Hernández explains.

No refuge

Anguish of Chechens in exile

The Story of My Life

The Story of My Life and The Silver Throat of the Moon by refugee writers

First Person

Pili Akili from Tanzania and Amarakoon Disanayaka Piyasena from Sri Lanka talk about living with mental illness in village communities.

Body blows

Disabled women bear the brunt of extreme prejudice in Zimbabwe. Gladys Charowa has seen it all.

tChorba

tChorba by Les Yeux Noirs.

Robots address child abuse

Technology used to help in the campaign against child jockeys

Stuff Pity!

People with disabilities in the Majority World want equal rights. Dinyar Godrej on why there is still much to be done.

A Letter to the Prime Minister

A Letter to the Prime Minister directed by Julia Guest.

Sri Lankan ecosystems in dire straits

Government to halt a controversial ship canal project.

The tips are my toes

Mosharraf Hossain on how childhood polio made him determined to shake the complacency of Bangladeshi society.

Hotel Solidarity

Worker-run hotel in Argentina a hit

Come out of the shadows on disability

Beatriz Satizabal has taken the knocks of Colombia’s macho society to emerge as her own woman. Her focus now is independence and changing prejudice.

Brothers

Brothers directed by Susanne Blier

Garbage blues

Urvashi Butalia visits a friend in Tokyo who is besieged by Japan’s punitive new recycling legislation. Back in Delhi she wonders if the Indian approach to rubbish is any better.

‘Drink Coca- Cola’ wall painting

The image that irked Coca- Cola, by Indian photographer

Bright sparks

A visual celebration of the right to education.

Charmless change

Gentrification has hit the oldest areas of Beirut, to Reem Haddad’s great chagrin.

Learning curve

Latha Janet on teaching from experience.

The North Caspian - what am I bid?

A visit to the new oil frontier in Kazakhstan leaves Horatio Morpurgo wondering where on earth we go from here.

Cover of the Migration issue of New Internationalist

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Migration issue

Why are refugees dying on the shores of prosperous, peacetime Europe? Are the numbers really unmanageable? And what if border controls brought more migrants into the rich world, not less? This month’s New Internationalist digs deeper into the backstory to Europe’s refugee crisis – and lays out an alternative, humanitarian vision that recognizes the reality of 21st century migration.

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10 economic myths

Does repeating a thing make it true? The followers of mainstream economic dogma must surely think ‘Yes’. After the financial crash of 2008 and the malaise ever since, they haven’t changed their tune much. Their prescriptions don’t work but the patients – you or me – are still being dosed with ‘freemarket’ medicine. We’ve worked on this edition in the spirit of providing something of an antidote. The economic bottom line is inevitable, say the powers that be. Just the way things are. Well, we – and an ever-growing legion of dissenting economists and fed-up-to-the-back-teeth members of the general public – say, ‘No’. These cherished myths are causing real harm and we need to ditch them.

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