New Internationalist

Cover for Nuclear's second wind (Issue 382)

September 2005's Issue

With growing consensus about the dangers posed by climate change and the need to curb our emissions of greenhouse gases, an increasingly vocal assortment of environmental, scientific, government and industry evangelists are preaching the gospel of nuclear salvation. Almost 20 years on from the Chernobyl disaster, the nuclear industry now appears to be recovering from the fallout of negative public opinion and is increasingly being seen as a ‘green’ solution to the world’s intensifying energy demands. This issue of the NI seeks to unpack the arguments supporting a renewed interest in nuclear power and some of the enduring impacts of our quest to harness the power of the atom.

Every month, we put up a selection of articles from the magazine. To enjoy the complete magazine, subscribe and receive three free issues and a world map. Or buy a digital subscription which gives you unlimited access to all magazines since 2007 and for a year after purchase on your computer or mobile device, in their original full-colour design.

Featured in issue 382

A feeling of helplessness

Kashmiri poet Murtaza Shibli works on the London Underground, where he thought he was safe from bombings and destruction – until 7/7.

Carol Kaminju

A boy carrying firewood home, captured by Kenyan photographer Carol Kaminju.

Action

No nukes is good nukes; find out how.

  • 1 Sep 2005
  • 0

Renew yourself

Think renewables are no match for nuclear? Think again.

  • 1 Sep 2005
  • 0

Green & Black

Alex Kelly and Carla Deane find Aboriginal Australians leading the fight against the nuclear industry.

Chernobyl: a fever of forgetting

As we approach the 20-year anniversary of the world’s worst nuclear accident at Chernobyl, Magnum photographer Paul Fusco meets the children born years later but still suffering from its terrible legacy.

Fusion illusion

Proponents of new fusion technology promise it will deliver clean and limitless power to the masses. Peter Montague is having a case of déjà-vu.

Toxic time bomb

Tonnes of poorly contained radioactive waste threatens to become an ecological disaster in Central Asia. Gulnura Toralieva reports from Kyrgyzstan.

Cancer rates near nuclear stations – blight or ‘blip’?

Recent scientific research suggests that higher cancer rates near nuclear power stations are a direct result of higher radiation exposure.

  • 1 Sep 2005
  • 0

Minority report

Science is often heavily biased towards nuclear technology. Alice Cutler speaks to Dr Ian Fairlie about the impacts of government and industry influence.

Liquid sunshine

Paul-E Comeau looks back at some of the cultural impacts of the ‘Atomic Age’.

Nuclear is the new black

Nuclear is becoming cool again, thanks to concerns over global warming. Adam Ma’anit thinks it’s all just a lot of hot air.

Wild Grass - China’s Revolution from Below

Wild Grass - China’s Revolution from Below by Ian Johnson

Mao - The Unknown Story

Mao - The Unknown Story by Jung Chang and Jon Halliday

You've Stolen My Heart

You’ve Stolen My Heart by The Kronos Quartet and Asha Bhosle.

Zaboum!!

Zaboum!! by Mina Agossi

Arakimentari

Arakimentari directed by Travis Klose.

The Night of Truth

The Night of Truth directed by Fanta Régina Nacro

Than Shwe

Sullen, unresponsive and boring he may be, but Than Shwe is Burma’s Number One, leader of one of the world’s most brutal regimes. The banality of evil has rarely been more apparent.

  • 1 Sep 2005
  • 0

A despot's disgrace

Uzbek protestors flee after bloody crackdown.

Spellbound

Women accused of witchcraft seek sanctuary.

UNESCO stands up

UNESCO member states have decided to recommend an international convention to protect cultural diversity and the right of member states to craft their own cultural policies.

  • 1 Sep 2005
  • 0

Upheaval in the French Pacific

As the media focus on crises in the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Nauru, a political earthquake elsewhere in the Pacific islands has passed largely unnoticed.

Africa: the sleeping lion rises

Africans sue Disney over copyright infringement.

Colombia’s abortive laws

Desperation over abortion in Colombia.

  • 1 Sep 2005
  • 0

Birdsong regained

Victory for Paraguay’s landless

Ukraine

When Ukrainians celebrated New Year 2005 in Kiev in a delirious sea of orange and anthems of the revolution, the future looked bright. But divisions remain.

Breaking silence

Arab women have suddenly started appearing on reality TV, to Reem Haddad’s surprise.

Interview with Hassan Juma'a Awad from Iraq's General Union of Oil Workers

Trade unionist Hassan Juma’a Awad stood up against Saddam and now he’s standing up for oil workers against the occupation of Iraq and the privatization of its oil.

Polyp's Big Bad World – September 2005

Two faces of wanton murder, as seen by Polyp.

Blenheim & Bangalore

The relationship between English aristocrats and impoverished Indian farmers is all too evident to Rahul Rao.

Cover of the What has development done for me? of New Internationalist

On Newsstands

What has development done for me?

40 years

Subscribe

Online now

The Feral Rich

The feral rich… are always with us, but ever richer and more savage. What can we do to stop the feckless rich, as they ravage economies to feather their nests? Jan/Feb 2013's New Internationalist magazine.

More from the magazine

Magazine Archive

Get our free fortnightly eNews

Multimedia

More Videos Now Playing: Nada
Videos from visionOntv's globalviews channel.

Regular columns

New Internationalist Magazine Issue 436

If you would like to know something about what's actually going on, rather than what people would like you to think was going on, then read the New Internationalist.

– Emma Thompson –

A subscription to suit you

Save money with a digital subscription. Give a gift subscription that will last all year. Or get yourself a free trial to New Internationalist. See our choice of offers.

Subscribe