NI: Global Issues for Learners of English > The Issues > Iraq > Sanctions introduction

logo

The UN sanctions against Iraq

The price of sanctions: stories of suffering

The price of sanctions: facts and figures

Six steps to ending the sanctions

 

In 1990, the UN imposed sanctions against Iraq in the form of an almost complete embargo on trade: that means Iraq can import and export almost nothing.
The sanctions have caused terrible suffering to the people of Iraq.

Iraq cover of NI

Is the suffering of the Iraqi people a price worth paying?

Madeleine Albright says Yes.

In 1996 Albright was the US ambassador to the United Nations.
In an American TV interview, she was told that 500,000 Iraqi children were thought to have died.

Interviewer: is the price worth it?

 

 

Albright: we think the price is worth it.

Others say No.

Ritter: the sanctions target the  people, not the President.

Ritter resigned from the UN weapons inspecting team (UNSCOM) because he said that the USA was using weapons inspections in order to continue the sanctions, not as a way of making sure that Iraq disarmed.


 

This information is taken from the September 1999 issue of the New Internationalist.
Source of updated information on resignations, The Guardian Weekly Vol162/No9

© 1999: the New Internationalist


NI: Global Issues for Learners of English > The Issues > Iraq > Sanctions introduction

 

Inter-activities For Learners For Teachers About us Readers' Letters

 

Last Modified: 27th February 2000

Printer-friendly version of this page