New Internationalist

Prize-winning anniversary

October 1980

New Internationalist

No-one will ever buy a magazine on world poverty’. So said the sceptics when New Internationalist was launched - 10 years ago this month. Today the magazine has 30,000 faithful subscribers and one-man editorial offices in Toronto and Melbourne. New readers - including teachers, clergymen, doctors and students across five continents - are joining at the rate of 450 a month.

Now the New Internationalist has won world-wide recognition for its work in the media. The 1980 Paul Hoffman Prize, named after the founder of the United Nations Development Programme and administered by a distinguished inter­national panel, has been awarded to the New Internationalist Co-operative for ‘services to world development’. Presented in London by Shridath Ramphal, Commonwealth Secretary General and a key member of the Brandt Commission, the award marks N.I’s ‘outstanding activities’ in bringing alive the problems shared by the world’s 1,000 million poor.

Meanwhile the New Internationalist plans to go it alone. After a decade of help and vital financial support from Oxfam, Christian Aid and other friends the N.I. is making its own bid for self­sufficiency. In the past, our readers have helped build the reputation of the New Internationalist. In future, your support means our survival. Thanks to you all.

This column was published in the October 1980 issue of New Internationalist. To read more, buy this issue or subscribe.

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