New Internationalist

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Experiences using Redmine for task management

Charlie Harvey on the redmine task management system that New Internationalist’s web group are trialling.

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Tech Briefing: Node and more

Charlie Harvey  writes up his August 2013 reading day, which he mainly spent learning about node.js

Tips for searching newint.org

Charlie Harvey looks at some top tips for searching the New Internationalist website.

BarnCamp 2011

New Internationalist’s IT manager heads off to the Barncamp once more…

Tech Tools for Activists

A new booklet is aimed at helping activists deal with increasing police surveillance in cyberspace. 

Web Censorship Roundup

An increasingly totalitarian regime wants to introduce mass internet censorship in a fundamentally undemocratic way. Web users may be disconnected and web sites taken down with no due process or clear evidence on the say-so of shadowy unelected bodies. Oh, and Google finally stood up to Chinese internet censorship.

Bricolage: Localhostin' it and other news

I’ve had my head down in a large Bricolage CMS project over the last few weeks (well, that and some packing), so it was time that I came up for some air and some technical blogging. First exciting bit of news to report is David Wheeler’s announcement about the released of Bricolage 1.11.3 last week. This is the first (and hopefully last!) beta toward the release of Bricolage 2.0. There is a lot of shiny-new fun in this release, so you should give it a try if you’re so inclined.

The next bit of fun is also Bricolage related…

Perl: Love it, or hate it, but don't ignore it.

Call me a curmudgeon (and many do), but I just can’t understand why intelligent folks make the choice to completely ignore Perl. I can understand if you don’t want to use it yourself — that’s all cool — but I wish folks would at least give it the nod it deserves.

Case in point: I was reading Simon Wilson’s excellent blog post about Node.js — an "evented I/O for V8 javascript” and was surprised that he only referenced Twisted (Python) and EventMachine (Ruby) when talking about non-blocking event-driven frameworks.

Why no mention of Perl?

Re-thinking resistance in the age of the cloud

Activist organizations are getting bitten by storing their data in "the cloud" and there is a lot that can be done about it.  Over the years, I’ve seen this happen, more than a few times, to organizations that I’ve worked with. Heck, it’s happened twice in the last year just to New Internationalist. But the question is: as Web services used by these organizations shut-down, or — worse — when they willingly hand out data to any repressive regime that asks for it, are there enough alternatives being developed to provide, well, alternatives? 

This concern was brought back to life for me recently with the news that the micro-blogging service Twitter allegedly assisted authorities in locating an activist during the G-20 Protest in Pittsburgh, resulting in his arrest.. The possible collusion of services like Twitter is a relatively new activist security concern, historically concerns focused on the all-too-frequent seizure of Internet servers and hardware used by activists and organizations like Indymedia. But now that people’s data is moving "into the cloud," there are a lot more issues to be concerned about. 

Promoting projects that are written in Perl

I got a great e-mail from Gabor earlier this week that proposed a simple challenge: Let’s not get distracted trying to promote Perl itself, but — instead — let’s focus on promoting projects written in Perl.

One of those projects — the one I’m most excited about on a day-to-day basis — is Bricolage, the enterprise-class content management system. Gabor’s note — which asked about the status of the project — makes me wonder why more folks in the Perl community aren’t taking a closer look at what is undoubtedly one of the most capable publishing systems on the market today?

So, in the interest of beating the drum for a Perl project that’s alive and well, I wanted to summarize what I think is exciting about the Bricolage project right now:

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